Going David LANEY | Part 2 – HK100

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This was my second time in Asia and I have an impression that trail running becomes more and more popular over there. Especially it is the case of Hong Kong which has an enormous population and wonderful trails which are easily accessible from skyscrapers backyards.

I have never run such a long race at the end of January, a month that is usually dedicated to recovery, therefore suddenly started gamble looked as prolonged and never-ending 2015 season.

I was told that Hong Kong is a great place with no winds and warm all year long. Hence, coming from deep winter back home, I put just few T-shirts and shorts in my luggage and expected to sweat a lot consider humidity of China’s special administrative region. Oh boy, how wrong I was! It seems that European runners brought cold winter to Hong Kong along.

Vibram Hong Kong 100  (HK100) started with very low temperatures and super strong winds, which made waiting at the start line almost as challenging as upcoming race itself. I don’t know how other Europeans felt at that moment, but for me, even coming from -25°C winter, it was icecold. However, I notice that sometimes feeling really bad before the important event doesn’t necessarily mean that competition itself would be shitty. So, with my messed up mind and frozen body I was praying for a miracle.

HK100 is notorious for its steps and concrete trails, but after few running sessions with local runners prior to the race, I felt confident and kind of comfortable there. HK100 is a fast race and – speaking about speed – François and Long Fei come on the scene. Two different and very strong runners, who almost certainly are the winners, no matter the race. Anyway, it made my planning easier, since now I knew whom to stick with. I followed them almost to Ma On Shan and was pretty sure that could keep their pace till the finish line. However, when “flat” part of HK100 ended, they showed great ascending skills and literally disapeared, leaving me alone. Running third seemed to be a good option for early season so I focused more on keeping my place rather than hunting them down.

Ultimately, the wonder happened and I finished third. Moreover, it turned out that I am among only six runners ever to conclude the course under the time of ten hours. All this caused that after HK100 I substantially rebuilt my confidence. I knew it is high-time to forget OTS, over-racing and other bullshit worries. Because it is not for me!

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